Alumni College 2017

 
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Alumni College 2017


**IMPORTANT: THE WEATHER ON 07-22 IS EXPECTED TO REACH 94 DEGREES**

THE EVENT TONIGHT WILL BE OUTDOORS - IN A FIELD, WITHOUT A TENT, AND WITHOUT A WHOLE LOT OF SHADE!

PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE DRESS APPROPRIATELY.
WEAR A HAT.     BRING YOUR SUNGLASSES.     DRINK LOTS OF WATER.

 


Alumni College 2016 Participants enjoy Mark Lucas's Farm at Closing Dinner.

**IMPORTANT: THE WEATHER ON 07-22 IS EXPECTED TO REACH 94 DEGREES**

THE EVENT TONIGHT WILL BE OUTDOORS - IN A FIELD, WITHOUT A TENT, AND WITH MINIMAL SHADE! PLEASE, PLEASE, PLEASE DRESS APPROPRIATELY.

WEAR A HAT. BRING YOUR SUNGLASSES. DRINK LOTS OF WATER.

 



Single Registration: $600.00
Couple Registration: $1100.00

ALUMNI COLLEGE 2017 – SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

Thursday, July 20
2:00 – 5:30 p.m. – Registration & Check-In, Brockman Community Building
3:30 – 4:30 p.m. – Campus Tour with Current Students, Leaving from Brockman Community Building
6:00 p.m. – Welcome Reception & Dinner, Evans-Lively Room, 2nd Floor, Old Carnegie
7:30 p.m. – Eat. Drink. Dance. And Be Irish! St. Patty’s Day in July, Weisiger Park (optional)   (check w/Nick)    

Friday, July 21
8:00 – 9:20 a.m. – Continental Breakfast, Brockman Community Building with Milton & Sandy

9:30 – 11:00 a.m. - Class #1
Stephen Rolfe Powell: Glass Demo & Chat

Jones Visual Arts Center

Kerry Paumi: Volcanoes: Who, What, Where and Why at Centre?

Crounse Hall
What is a volcano? Where are they found? Who do they impact? Why do we study them at Centre College? We will scratch the surface of the vast field of volcanology and discuss the answers to these questions and learn about how to we study volcanoes. From the identification of rocks from volcanic sites, to the study of the economic impacts, we will explore both the basic science of volcanoes and the impact they have on our global community.

Robert Bosco & Matthew Pierce: Political Activism in Trump's America: Muslim and Christian Approaches
Crounse Hall
Since the election of Donald Trump, religious communities around the country have felt compelled to take on a greater role in political and social activism.  Networks of Religious Socialists and Religious Anarchists have re-formed to engage in direct action on issues such as economic justice, labor, race, immigration, and LGBTQ rights.  In addition, despite the recent rise of anti-Muslim harassment, many Muslim groups feel increasingly aligned with left-leaning political groups and have noticeably increased their cooperation with Jewish community leaders and gay rights activists. Pierce and Bosco will discuss these recent shifts in the political and religious landscape of our country and what it means going forward.

11:15 a.m. – Load Bus, JVAC Parking Lot
11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. - Lunch @ Stephen Powell’s Glass Studio

1:30 – 3:00 p.m. - Class #2
Ravi Radhakrishnan: A Tale of Two Countries: Causes, Consequences, and Cure for Growing Inequality

Crounse Hall
Income and wealth inequality in the United States is at its highest level in 100 years. In this class, we will look at the data on the changing distribution of income and wealth in the U.S, and examine who the real beneficiary of the rising income and wealth is. Further, we will discuss the causes of the rising inequality; the social and political ramifications of widening income and wealth gaps; and discuss potential ways of alleviating this problem.

Nathan Link: Folk Music of Kentucky
Grant Hall
This course will offer a brief overview of the folk music of Kentucky, looking at the traditions of ballad singing, old-time fiddle and banjo music, and bluegrass, and considering the ways in which these genres continue to influence music today.

3:30 – 5:00 p.m. – Class #3
Ray Hammond: Whisk(e)y: An Eight Hundred Year Human Enterprise
Crounse Hall
While various products of fermentation were enjoyed by several human cultures as long ago as 6000 BCE, products of distillation are much more recent. We will survey 800 years of human experience with whisk(e)y, focusing on history, evolution of production techniques, origin of varieties, and, the recent market explosion. Finally, we will clarify the similarities and distinctions among the various whisk(e)y products.

Stephanie Fabritius & Mike Hamm: Migrant Aviators: The Mysteries of Birds and Butterflies
Crounse Hall
The Arctic Tern, the record holder of all avian species in terms of migration, travels 44,120 miles each year in its round trip migration.  Less dramatic, but more common, many songbirds annually migrate 1,700 miles – nonstop in a single direction! Nevertheless, birds are not the only long-distance migrants. In the fall, migratory monarch butterflies journey as far as 3,000 miles to mountaintop roosts in Mexico where they’ve never been before.  What drives these species to make such long distance movements?  How do they find their way?  What implications do these long-range migrations have for the conservation of species?  Michael Hamm and Stephanie Fabritius will lead an exploration into these and other questions related to long-range migration.

5:00 - 6:30 p.m. – FREE TIME!
6:30 p.m. – Load bus, JVAC Parking Lot
7:00 p.m. – Dinner at Nellie Burton's, Danville, Kentucky
9:30 p.m. – Showing of Stagecoach, Brockman Community Building

Saturday, July 22

8:00 – 9:20 a.m. - Continental Breakfast, Evans-Lively Room, Old Carnegie

9:30 – 11:00 a.m. - Class #4
Milton Reigelman: Moby-Dick as the Key to All Knowledge, Therapy, and Fun

Crounse Hall 301
Woody Allen once blamed all of his multiple neuroses on once being at a cocktail party and feeling inferior because he’d never read Moby-Dick!  Save yourself such embarrassment in the future by taking a look at two of its short, 135 incomparable chapters.  Forget about that stupid maniacal Captain Ahab and preposterous, blubbery white whale.  The Catskill eagle in your souls will soar into the sunny spaces, surely, by focusing on the actual subject of the novel: one Ishmael.

Eric Mount: Forgiveness and Politics: Ne’er the Twain?
Crounse Hall 401
Is there a need, a place, and a possibility for forgiveness in our institutional and political lives as well as our individual lives? Celebrations of America’s past greatness can sometimes imply unblemished goodness. Past wrongs can go unaddressed and un-redressed. Ethicist Donald Shriver’s Grawmeyer Award Winner in Religion in 2009 was entitled Honest Patriots: Loving a Country Enough to Remember Its Misdeeds. Ardent patriots often find it difficult to regard such honesty as the best policy, especially if they occupy positions of political leadership. Our exploration will pay particular attention to the responses to the massacre of nine African Americans by Dylann Roof at Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston, S.C. and to the responses to the laying of peace wreaths at Pearl Harbor by Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and at Hiroshima by America’s President Barack Obama.

11:15 a.m. – Load Bus, JVAC Parking Lot
11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. – Lunch at Jane Barleycorn’s Market & Bar, Danville, KY

2:00 – 3:30 p.m. - Class #5
Beau Weston: The World Is Getting Better (So Why Doesn’t it Feel Like It?)
Crounse Hall 405
The world has improved in the modern age in nearly every respect we usually measure. The last two generations, in particular, have been a time of great strides forward on most fronts in most parts of the world. The world is richer, healthier, longer-lived, freer, more democratic, less violent, more equal, more tolerant, and happier. Even many of our problems are the problems of a rich world, such as obesity, diseases of old age, and climate problems from vastly increased energy availability.  Yet your first reaction is probably “that can’t be true.”  You may even feel that we shouldn’t say such things even if they are true.

My talk is about the many ways in which the world has gotten better, and the few in which it hasn’t.  An equally important part of my talk is why we are so inclined to resist believing this good news.

Charles Vahlkamp & Stacey Peebles: John Ford's Stagecoach: What Makes a Masterpiece?
Vahlkamp Theater, Crounse Hall (Basement Level)

On the surface, this 1939 film is a diverting classic Western, with big skies and a big new hero for Hollywood--John Wayne. But look closer, and the film is also a masterpiece of subtle storytelling, a radical look at class and gender, and an aesthetic marvel. Not for nothing did Orson Welles once say that he'd watched it forty times while making Citizen Kane!

3:30 – 6:15 p.m. – FREE TIME! Check-out downtown shops, visit the Centre bookstore, stroll around campus
6:30 p.m. – Load Vans, JVAC Parking Lot

7:00 p.m. – Closing Dinner
Mark Lucas ’75: The Busk @ Walden
1537 Pope Road, Danville, Kentucky

Join us for the closing dinner catered by Marksbury Farm with live Bluegrass music. We will gather at Dr. Lucas's replica of Henry David Thoreau's Walden cabin for a recreation of a Native American practice that Thoreau admired, the busk. Thoreau loved the idea of casting worn out or superfluous items into a bonfire in an annual purification ritual marking a fresh start. Please bring an item of symbolic import to toss into the bonfire. (Articles for the fire at past such events have ranged from rejection letters, chemistry tests, betting tickets, and cigarette packs to Christmas ties, platform heels, how-to books, and old mix tapes.)

Sunday, July 23

8:00 – 9:30 a.m. – Hot Breakfast Buffet, Evans-Lively Room, Old Carnegie
10:00 a.m. – "Graduation" Ceremony, Evans-Lively Room, Old Carnegie

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Contact Information

Primary Contact

Megan Haake Milby '03
859.466.1473 - cell

Date & Location

Date: 7/20/2017 to 7/23/2017
Location: Brockman Commons & Centre's Campus